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More than a fifth of all tourist beds are now contracted by states for refugees and others, according to the report

The Tourism Association reports that more than one-fifth of Ireland’s tourist destinations are now contracted to the state. If the inventory of rooms for visitors continues to decline at the current pace, next year’s guests could pay more for accommodation, and the industry could lose up to 1 billion euros of her revenue.

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The Tourism Industry Association reports that more than one-fifth of Ireland’s tourist destinations are now contracted to the state.If the inventory of rooms for visitors continues to decline at the current pace, next year’s guests could pay more for accommodation, and the industry could lose up to 1 billion euros of her revenue. Yes, she adds.”Currently, 22% of the country’s tourist accommodation, including 15% of hotel rooms, is contracted to accommodate people fleeing Ukraine and about 5,000 asylum seekers from other countries.” she said ITIC.Outside Dublin, the figures are particularly high, with more than 40 percent of tourist accommodation in County Kerry and “half of all tourist accommodation in County Donegal” being contracted to accommodate refugees, the report said. increase.

Eoghan O’Mara Walsh, CEO of ITIC, said:”We strongly support the Irish government’s generous humanitarian approach and believe it is important that the wider tourism industry plays a role in tackling this crisis. “But we cannot be a major accommodation provider, otherwise the whole situation will have unintended consequences and severe economic damage to the industry.“There will be a complete shortage of supply and demand. Unfortunately, prices will only go up.”

Prices for tourist accommodation in Ireland are already rising due to factors such as rising costs and staffing issues, according to ITIC. According to reports, his average daily room rate in Dublin increased by 23% in September compared to the same month in 2019.With limited supply, further increases “risk damaging Ireland’s competitiveness and prolonging its recovery from the pandemic-induced shutdown,” he added.ITIC is the group representing Ireland’s tourism industry, with members ranging from the DAA he Aer Lingus to the Innkeepers to the Irish Hotels Federation. Her report on the impact of the conflict in Ukraine on Irish tourism was published in November.

“Good Samaritan”Hotels, B&Bs and other businesses in Ireland that accommodate people fleeing war or persecution are paid to do so.Around €440 million is expected to be spent on such shelters by the end of 2023, according to the Department for Children, Equality, Disability, Inclusion and Youth, which manages Ireland’s response.More than 650 accommodation contracts have been signed, “covering more than 38,900 beds in hotels, hostels, commercial self-contained accommodation and certain emergency or conversion facilities,” it said.A department spokesman said 2022 “has had very good support from the hotel industry, even during the tourist season.” Last week, Green Party leader Eamon Ryan likened private hoteliers and B&Bs that host Ukrainian war refugees to the Good Samaritan performing “important services.

“But Omara Walsh said the hotel will be paid for under commercial agreements, but there could be “further implications” for tourist bed shortages next year.Fáilte Ireland’s research shows that for every €1 a visitor spends on accommodation, €2.50 is spent on other services. “Downstream businesses such as tourist destinations, restaurants, pubs, tour guides and cultural businesses will suffer.” According to the ITIC report, if 30% of the tourist accommodation inventory were to be outsourced to the state, the sector’s costs could lead to as much as €1 billion in lost revenue.

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